Month: January 2019

Review: Glass (Carson’s View)

Glass.  The conclusion of M. Night Shyamalan’s Unbreakable Trilogy left the audience wanting more.  Not from a “can’t wait to see the next movie” sense, but more of a “really, that’s it?” sense.  Shyamalan is known for his brilliantly laid-out, thought provoking, one-of-a-kind works of art. He is as equally known for his confusing, dull, wastes-of-time.  Glass falls somewhere in the middle. 

The world built in the Unbreakable Trilogy is an interesting one.  It is a world on the cusp of being introduced to super heroes and villains.  These are a very different type of comic book movies than the Marvel and DC films we are getting today. These are grounded in reality. Character driven. Dark and gritty.  Slow moving with few action sequences.  This technique worked really well in Unbreakable, it was good in Split, and it was just boring in Glass. With this cast, these characters, these backstories, and this director, the stage was set for Glass to be something legendary. 

The most disappointing thing about Glass is the expectation that Shyamalan had a grand design for this trilogy from the start.  That he had some ingenious way of bringing these worlds together into this epic unexpected conclusion.  Perhaps it is unfair to continue to hold Shyamalan to his previous greatness.  He established a reputation early that he has not been able to live up to since.  I believe he is truly a victim of his own success.  Very few directors are held to such a high standard. The ending of Split teased us that he might still have something left in the tank.  That he could still pull one over on the audience just like the good old days.  Unfortunately, Glass did not deliver on those expectations and Shyamalan remains a shadow of his former self. Glass is not a bad movie, just wasted potential. 

Episode 77: Glass

Garrett and Carson break through Glass, M. Night Shyamalan’s last film in the Unbreakable trilogy.

Episode 76: Aquaman

Garrett and Carson wade through Aquaman.

Review: Glass (Garrett’s View)

Glass is disappointing and a missed chance at a return to form for one of the most entertaining directors of a generation.

Review: Revenger (Garrett’s View)

A boring mash-up of 90’s plot and early 2000’s action.

Episode 75: Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse

Garrett and Carson swing by to talk about Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse.

Review: Roma (Garrett’s View)

For all of its filmmaking mastery, the story at its core always feels an arm’s length away.

Review: Blindspotting (Garrett’s View)

Blindspotting is a poignant generational film that will serve as a snapshot of these times and only grow in its relevance as the years pass.

Episode 74: 2018: Year in Review

Garrett and Carson recap all things 2018.

Review: Aquaman (Carson’s View)

I have held off writing my review of Aquaman until I could fully grasp how I felt about the movie. The best that I could come up with is that it was “Good?”.  I love comic book movies.  I love Jason Momoa. I really want DC to turn things around and make can’t-miss movies like Marvel does.  I keep hearing all the hype and praise around this movie and it makes me conflicted.  On one side, it makes me happy that comic book movies are still being so well received so they will continue to make more.  On the other side, it makes me upset that people are satisfied with what Aquaman gave us and that future movies will be made similarly. 

Jason Momoa is awesome.  The guy is a bad ass.  He makes Aquaman cool.  He carries this movie on his massive shoulders. They should have kept the orange costume off the posters and revealed it in the movie. That could have been an epic scene.  Dolph was cast perfectly as King Nereus, although they did not give him much to work with.  The effects looked good for what they were. They weren’t perfect, however, it is very hard to make a guy riding a seahorse underwater look real. It absolutely superseded the Justice League effects which is definitely a low bar, but moving in the right direction is a plus.

My main issue with Aquaman is the lazy, stale, unoriginal, 100% predictable, standard plotline.  It feels like director James Wan spent his time on the action scenes and the effects and never cared about the dull screenplay he was given. Had Aquaman come out in 2002 side-by-side with Sam Raimi’s Spider-Man, it would have been legendary.  But releasing in 2018 along side of Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse, you can’t hope that your action scenes will cover up your boring story.  Comic book movie fans expect and deserve better.