Article

A post that is representing a written movie review.

Review: Antebellum (Garrett’s View)

Antebellum feels like a cheap knock-off rather than a rich homage to Get Out and Us.

Review: Antebellum (Carson’s View)

Antebellum is the next victim of the COVID-19 pandemic.  With Lionsgate opting for a digital rather than their planned full theatrical release, Antebellum is going to try to take advantage of the new platform and lack of any solid new competition.  On a budget of less than $15 million, it seems likes a sound strategy.

The main issue the audience should have with Antebellum comes before they ever sit down to watch.  The trailers create a false perception of the type of movie they are about to see.  Using clips and editing tricks that are not in the actual movie, they paint a very different “horror” expectation.  It does still fit in the horror/suspense genre, however, not in the same way the marketing suggests.

Antebellum doesn’t waste any time throwing you right into the terror.  The graphic and disturbing depiction of life on a southern plantation for a slave almost makes you welcome the lull in the middle of the movie.  Janelle Monáe stars, who in the last few years has created quite the filmography for herself.  She doesn’t disappoint by delivering another dynamic performance.

Before you click play on the latest Bruce Willis straight-to-Amazon-Prime-vehicle thinking “I know the last 8 were terrible, but maybe this one will be like Die Hard,” go ahead check out Antebellum instead. It leans more on concept than substance, but is still an entertaining watch. Just do yourself a favor and avoid all trailers.

Review: Ready or Not (Carson’s View)

Ready or Not puts a unique spin on the “People Hunting People” genre

Review: Good Boys (Carson’s View)

The people who will enjoy Good Boys the most are the ones who shouldn’t be allowed to see it in the first place

Review: Hobbs & Shaw (Carson’s View)

Before you spend your hard earned money or valuable time watching Hobbs & Shaw, please do yourself a favor and watch the trailer.  That way you know exactly what you are getting into.  And if you feel like you need some non-stop, over-the-top ridiculousness in your life, then absolutely go get yourself a ticket.

Hobbs & Shaw is just what this summer needed. The first spin-off to the Fast and Furious franchise is an action-packed, light-hearted adventure. The Rock’s usual smoldering charisma is in full force as he brings Jason Statham into comedic banter.  Vanessa Kirby is a fantastic addition to the series. She more than holds her own between two massive egos.  Both title characters deliver their signature ass-kicking styles and many explosions to make you forget all about Vin Diesel.

Hobbs & Shaw is fun.  Movie logic, physics, and common sense were abandoned when making this movie, and that’s okay. They completely lean into the absurdity and that’s what makes it so entertaining. Turn your brain off and enjoy the ride.

Review: I Am Mother (Garrett’s View)

A well-crafted sci-fi movie with enough twists to keep a potentially tropey plot feeling fresh.

Review: The Lion King (2019) (Carson’s View)

The visual effects team truly outdid themselves with this one.

Review: Anna (Carson’s View)

It is an absolute mess to follow with no redeeming qualities

Review: Child’s Play (2019) (Carson’s View)

Child’s Play is a movie franchise about a 29 inch tall toy doll named Chucky who kills people.  Pretty straight forward premise. There have been seven Child’s Play movies proceeding this reboot.  Unlike many of the slasher horror movies, Chucky desperately needed to press the reset button.  It was a reboot that was needed, not a re-imagining.  Especially not when the re-imagining changes what makes Chucky a unique and interesting character.

Child’s Play brought in Mark Hamill to voice the new iteration of Chucky.  They changed the design of the doll which makes you wonder why anyone would buy this creepy thing in the first place.  They “aged-up” Andy in the remake to 13 from 6 years old.  All of these changes would have been acceptable had they kept what made Chucky the Chucky we know and love.  Instead, these changes were made to fit a new narrative in an attempt to be more relevant in today’s society.  It became another generic warning of where society and technology is going.

Child’s Play relies on a few gruesome murder scenes to carry the heavy lifting of this film.  A bit of humor and pop-culture references are sprinkled throughout, but not enough to distract me from the absence of the core of the original.  The Child’s Play for a new generation will be forgotten soon and I hope the next attempt will get back to the basics.

Review: Child’s Play (2019) (Garrett’s View)

Some enjoyable campy moments from Chucky’s lines to the heavy-R gore. But not full-on, tongue-in-cheek humor like its B-movie slasher predecessor.