Colin Farrell

Review: The Batman (Carson’s View)

A new Batman. One might ask how could there possibly be a new Batman that is different than the ones we have already seen. We have seen him dark and gloomy. We have seen him grounded in reality. We have seen him fight men who can fly. Unfortunately, we have also seen him neon and ridiculous. Now, we can add gritty and brooding to the list.

The Batman features Robert Pattinson as our new caped crusader. He leans into the “World’s Greatest Detective” title Batman has earned in DC Comics more than we have ever seen before on the big screen. The approach is new and interesting, however, the 3 hour runtime does this a disservice.

When I first saw the original trailer for The Batman, I had hoped they would make it an R Rating rather than PG-13. I understand that would limit accessibility, but this was the right time, cast, feel, and plot to go for it. “Battinson” is in a world without Superman, similar to the Christian Bale version. You do not need to protect these other kid-friendly DC properties as they will never cross-over. This franchise could have stood out from the pack, much like (formerly Netflix’s) Daredevil Series.  Instead, they straddle the line of not really appropriate for kids and not violent enough to make it different from the rest.

128: The Gentlemen

Garrett and Carson keep it civilized while reviewing Guy Ritchie’s return to the crime caper genre, The Gentlemen.

Review: Widows (Carson’s View)

Immediately after seeing the trailer for Widows, I had my concerns.  Although the only performance I was worried about was Michelle Rodriguez. I figured she would play the same typecast role she has been doing for years. The rest of this star-studded cast, I believed, would be pretty solid.  I was mostly worried about a predicable, stale plot, with an obvious ending.  As time went on I started to become more optimistic learning that Gillian Flynn, who wrote Gone Girl and Sharp Objects, also wrote the screenplay for this.  Knowing her M.O., I believed I would get a well thought out script, well developed characters, and a bit of a twist at the end.  Expectations creeped up a bit.

Unfortunately, I didn’t know the source material. Had I known, I might have been able to brace myself for what was to come. Widows was adapted from a mini-series. I think it would have greatly benefited from staying in the mini-series space.  There simply wasn’t enough time to devote to all the characters and plot points they tried to cram into this movie. Every performance (including Rodriguez) was on point, they just weren’t given enough to flesh out each character.  I do not know how the mini-series ended, but I hope it was done better than this. Everything seemed rushed and a bit lazy when it came to plot.

All the components are there to make this a great movie:  All-Star Cast, Oscar Winning Director, Award Winning Writer, and an interesting concept. It just couldn’t bring it all together. Widows isn’t a bad movie, it just did not live up to the potential. If I were speaking to Director Steve McQueen, I would simply quote the great John Creasy, “I wish… you had… more time”.

Episode 69: Widows

Garrett and Carson investigate the crime drama Widows and charge it with impersonating a heist film.

Review: Widows (Garrett’s View)

McQueen is an unquestionably skilled director who knows how to use his cast and cinematography to convey his message. In the case of Widows though, the abundance of messages never came together into a unified, compelling story which is what primarily keeps it from being great.